CHRAJ launches policy on privacy of clients (Dec 1)pg 49

The Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ) yesterday launched a policy to protect the privacy and confidentiality of its clients.

Named ‘Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality’, the document targets all persons who access the services of CHRAJ, as well as persons living with HIV/AIDS and key populations where the disease is predominant.
The main considerations that motivated the policy, according to the commission, included equality, fairness, privacy, use and sharing of clients’ information, non-discrimination, disclosures and holding records in confidence. 
 • Mr Richard Quayson, a Deputy Commissioner of CHRAJ, launching the document in Accra.
he Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ) yesterday launched a policy to protect the privacy and confidentiality of its clients.
Named ‘Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality’, the document targets all persons who access the services of CHRAJ, as well as persons living with HIV/AIDS and key populations where the disease is predominant.
The main considerations that motivated the policy, according to the commission, included equality, fairness, privacy, use and sharing of clients’ information, non-discrimination, disclosures and holding records in confidence.
The 15-page policy document launched as part of activities marking World AIDS Day, which was observed yesterday, December 1, is on the theme, “Ghana towards an HIV-free generation through preventing mother-to-child transmission, safe sex and stigma reduction”.
Developed with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the policy seeks to provide a general framework for defining private and confidential service delivery and guide all staff on what is required of them to create a conducive environment that assures the public and service users that privacy and confidentiality issues are taken very seriously.
It is also to build trust, ensure confidence and protect the integrity of the work of the commission.
A Deputy Commissioner of CHRAJ, Mr Richard A. Quayson, who launched the document, said as a “national human rights institution, the commission envisions a society that is free, just and equitable where human rights and human dignity are respected, where power is accountable and governance is transparent”.

National HIV/AIDS prevalence 

Ghana has made significant strides in reducing HIV/AIDS infection and is now targeting a zero infection.
According to the 2013 HIV Sentinel Survey Report, the national HIV prevalence in 2013 was 1.3 per cent. This means an estimated 224,488 people, comprising 189,931 adults and 34,557 children (15 per cent) were living with HIV in Ghana in 2013.
Mr Quayson said while it was important to recognise the achievement and keep the figures low, CHRAJ still saw continued discrimination and stigmatisation as conditions that could undo what the country had taken years to build.
“We hold that inherent in the dignity of the individual is the confident assurance that a person will not be exposed to discrimination, stigma or ridicule when that person accesses or seeks to have access to justice,” he said.

Discrimination Reporting System

To protect the interest of people living with HIV/AIDS, CHRAJ launched its Discrimination Reporting System last year.
The USAID Health Policy Consultant with CHRAJ, Mrs Vivian Sapormaa Fiscian, revealed that the commission had recorded 21 cases of discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS since the system was launched.
The cases ranged from denying people living with HIV/AIDS employment to partners of people living with the disease asking for divorce.
- See more at: http://graphic.com.gh/news/general-news/34703-chraj-launches-policy-on-privacy-of-clients.html#sthash.fFjWzRV9.dpuf
The 15-page policy document launched as part of activities marking World AIDS Day, which was observed yesterday, December 1, is on the theme, “Ghana towards an HIV-free generation through preventing mother-to-child transmission, safe sex and stigma reduction”. 

Developed with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the policy seeks to provide a general framework for defining private and confidential service delivery and guide all staff on what is required of them to create a conducive environment that assures the public and service users that privacy and confidentiality issues are taken very seriously.

It is also to build trust, ensure confidence and protect the integrity of the work of the commission. 

A Deputy Commissioner of CHRAJ, Mr Richard A. Quayson, who launched the document, said as a “national human rights institution, the commission envisions a society that is free, just and equitable where human rights and human dignity are respected, where power is accountable and governance is transparent”.

National HIV/AIDS prevalence 

Ghana has made significant strides in reducing HIV/AIDS infection and is now targeting a zero infection. 
According to the 2013 HIV Sentinel Survey Report, the national HIV prevalence in 2013 was 1.3 per cent. This means an estimated 224,488 people, comprising 189,931 adults and 34,557 children (15 per cent) were living with HIV in Ghana in 2013.

Mr Quayson said while it was important to recognise the achievement and keep the figures low, CHRAJ still saw continued discrimination and stigmatisation as conditions that could undo what the country had taken years to build. 

“We hold that inherent in the dignity of the individual is the confident assurance that a person will not be exposed to discrimination, stigma or ridicule when that person accesses or seeks to have access to justice,” he said.

Discrimination Reporting System
To protect the interest of people living with HIV/AIDS, CHRAJ launched its Discrimination Reporting System last year.

The USAID Health Policy Consultant with CHRAJ, Mrs Vivian Sapormaa Fiscian, revealed that the commission had recorded 21 cases of discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS since the system was launched.

The cases ranged from denying people living with HIV/AIDS employment to partners of people living with the disease asking for divorce.

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