Ghana makes gains in global anti-corruption perception index (Thursday, December 4, 2014) Front page

In spite of the increasing perception of corruption in Ghana, the country has recorded a marginal improvement on the global corruption index. 

Ghana is currently ranked 61 out of 175 countries surveyed across the world.

According to the latest report by Transparency International, Ghana has improved marginally in the last three years.

In 2012, Ghana scored 45 points out of 100; 46 points in 2013 and 48 in 2014 [0 means highly corrupt while 100 means very clean].

In the ranking order, the country ranked 64 out of 175 in 2012 and in 2013, the country placed 63 out of 175 countries.

Justice Emile Short and GACC reacts

But commenting on the report, a former Commissioner of the Commission for Human Right and Administrative Justice, Justice Francis Emile Short, said the latest CPI seemed “contrary to what we are experiencing in the country.”

“There are many voices that have expressed grave concern about the state of corruption in the country. The report does not reflect what we are experiencing,” he said.

The Executive Secretary of the Ghana Anti Corruption Coalition (GACC), Mrs Linda Ofori-Kwafo, said the marginal increase should not give Ghanaians a cause to rejoice.

According to her a plausible explanation for the differences between the Afrobarometer report released last Tuesday and the CPI could be the period within which the CPI data was collected.

Best performing countries 

First launched in 1995, the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) has been widely credited with putting the issue of corruption on the international policy agenda.

According to the index, the least corrupt country in the world is Denmark which scored 92 this year. The Scandinavian country has seen consistent improvement in its ranking since 2012.

The most corrupt countries in the world title went to North Korea and Somalia which have been tied at 8 points since 2012.

Scandinavian countries—Finland, Sweden, Norway— dominated the top 10 least corrupt countries in the world, placing 3rd, 4th and 5th respectively.

Ghana’s performance on the CPI ranking comes on the heels of numerous corruption allegations in the public sector and at a time when the 2014 Afrobarometer survey released last Tuesday showed increasing lost of trust in public institutions, including Parliament, the Police, the Presidency, the Judicial system, ruling and opposition parties.

Africa’s corruption figures still bad 

The report shows the majority of African countries still have a score of less than 50 per cent.  Botswana is ranked 31st as the continent’s best ranked country on the corruption index with 63 points.

Other African countries that performed better than Ghana are Cape Verde (42nd with 57 points); Seychelles (43rd with 55 points); Mauritius (47th with 54 points); Lesotho (55th with 49 points) and Namibia (55th with 49 points).

TI on corruption in Africa  

“In a continent with high level of economic growth rates (compared to many parts of the world), the persistence of widespread corruption is one of the factors inhibiting the transformation of the economic growth into development dividends for all citizens, preventing them from enjoying improved livelihoods and living conditions,” TI said of the performance of Africa on the CPI.

The anti-corruption institution said it should be a matter of global concern that while citizens in Africa were confronted with corruption, access to poor basic services, illicit financial flows from Africa were quickly draining the continent and depriving African countries of resources for investment and development.

Currently, illicit financial flows from Africa exceed combined inflows from official development assistance. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa estimates that the annual outflow of illicit finance through trade mispricing alone stands at about US$60 billion, having grown at a real rate of 32.5 per cent in the decade between 2000 and 2009.

It, therefore, called on governments, companies and citizens on the continent to work together to ensure Africa’s development was premised on real transparency, accountability and participation.
In spite of the increasing perception of corruption in Ghana, the country has recorded a marginal improvement on the global corruption index. Ghana is currently ranked 61 out of 175 countries surveyed across the world.
According to the latest report by Transparency International, Ghana has improved marginally in the last three years.
In 2012, Ghana scored 45 points out of 100; 46 points in 2013 and 48 in 2014 [0 means highly corrupt while 100 means very clean].
In the ranking order, the country ranked 64 out of 175 in 2012 and in 2013, the country placed 63 out of 175 countries.

Justice Emile Short and GACC reacts 

But commenting on the report, a former Commissioner of the Commission for Human Right and Administrative Justice, Justice Francis Emile Short, said the latest CPI seemed “contrary to what we are experiencing in the country.”
“There are many voices that have expressed grave concern about the state of corruption in the country. The report does not reflect what we are experiencing,” he said.
The Executive Secretary of the Ghana Anti Corruption Coalition (GACC), Mrs Linda Ofori-Kwafo, said the marginal increase should not give Ghanaians a cause to rejoice.
According to her a plausible explanation for the differences between the Afrobarometer report released last Tuesday and the CPI could be the period within which the CPI data was collected.

Best performing countries 

First launched in 1995, the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) has been widely credited with putting the issue of corruption on the international policy agenda.
According to the index, the least corrupt country in the world is Denmark which scored 92 this year. The Scandinavian country has seen consistent improvement in its ranking since 2012.
The most corrupt countries in the world title went to North Korea and Somalia which have been tied at 8 points since 2012.
Scandinavian countries—Finland, Sweden, Norway— dominated the top 10 least corrupt countries in the world, placing 3rd, 4th and 5th respectively.
Ghana’s performance on the CPI ranking comes on the heels of numerous corruption allegations in the public sector and at a time when the 2014 Afrobarometer survey released last Tuesday showed increasing lost of trust in public institutions, including Parliament, the Police, the Presidency, the Judicial system, ruling and opposition parties.

Africa’s corruption figures still bad 

The report shows the majority of African countries still have a score of less than 50 per cent.  Botswana is ranked 31st as the continent’s best ranked country on the corruption index with 63 points.
Other African countries that performed better than Ghana are Cape Verde (42nd with 57 points); Seychelles (43rd with 55 points); Mauritius (47th with 54 points); Lesotho (55th with 49 points) and Namibia (55th with 49 points).

TI on corruption in Africa  

“In a continent with high level of economic growth rates (compared to many parts of the world), the persistence of widespread corruption is one of the factors inhibiting the transformation of the economic growth into development dividends for all citizens, preventing them from enjoying improved livelihoods and living conditions,” TI said of the performance of Africa on the CPI.
The anti-corruption institution said it should be a matter of global concern that while citizens in Africa were confronted with corruption, access to poor basic services, illicit financial flows from Africa were quickly draining the continent and depriving African countries of resources for investment and development.
Currently, illicit financial flows from Africa exceed combined inflows from official development assistance. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa estimates that the annual outflow of illicit finance through trade mispricing alone stands at about US$60 billion, having grown at a real rate of 32.5 per cent in the decade between 2000 and 2009.
It, therefore, called on governments, companies and citizens on the continent to work together to ensure Africa’s development was premised on real transparency, accountability and participation.
- See more at: http://graphic.com.gh/news/general-news/34834-ghana-makes-gains-in-global-corruption-perception-index.html#sthash.K2Qg297G.dpuf
In spite of the increasing perception of corruption in Ghana, the country has recorded a marginal improvement on the global corruption index. Ghana is currently ranked 61 out of 175 countries surveyed across the world.
According to the latest report by Transparency International, Ghana has improved marginally in the last three years.
In 2012, Ghana scored 45 points out of 100; 46 points in 2013 and 48 in 2014 [0 means highly corrupt while 100 means very clean].
In the ranking order, the country ranked 64 out of 175 in 2012 and in 2013, the country placed 63 out of 175 countries.
Justice Emile Short and GACC reacts 
But commenting on the report, a former Commissioner of the Commission for Human Right and Administrative Justice, Justice Francis Emile Short, said the latest CPI seemed “contrary to what we are experiencing in the country.”
“There are many voices that have expressed grave concern about the state of corruption in the country. The report does not reflect what we are experiencing,” he said.
The Executive Secretary of the Ghana Anti Corruption Coalition (GACC), Mrs Linda Ofori-Kwafo, said the marginal increase should not give Ghanaians a cause to rejoice.
According to her a plausible explanation for the differences between the Afrobarometer report released last Tuesday and the CPI could be the period within which the CPI data was collected.
Best performing countries 
First launched in 1995, the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) has been widely credited with putting the issue of corruption on the international policy agenda.
According to the index, the least corrupt country in the world is Denmark which scored 92 this year. The Scandinavian country has seen consistent improvement in its ranking since 2012.
The most corrupt countries in the world title went to North Korea and Somalia which have been tied at 8 points since 2012.
Scandinavian countries—Finland, Sweden, Norway— dominated the top 10 least corrupt countries in the world, placing 3rd, 4th and 5th respectively.
Ghana’s performance on the CPI ranking comes on the heels of numerous corruption allegations in the public sector and at a time when the 2014 Afrobarometer survey released last Tuesday showed increasing lost of trust in public institutions, including Parliament, the Police, the Presidency, the Judicial system, ruling and opposition parties.
Africa’s corruption figures still bad 
The report shows the majority of African countries still have a score of less than 50 per cent.  Botswana is ranked 31st as the continent’s best ranked country on the corruption index with 63 points.
Other African countries that performed better than Ghana are Cape Verde (42nd with 57 points); Seychelles (43rd with 55 points); Mauritius (47th with 54 points); Lesotho (55th with 49 points) and Namibia (55th with 49 points).
TI on corruption in Africa  
“In a continent with high level of economic growth rates (compared to many parts of the world), the persistence of widespread corruption is one of the factors inhibiting the transformation of the economic growth into development dividends for all citizens, preventing them from enjoying improved livelihoods and living conditions,” TI said of the performance of Africa on the CPI.
The anti-corruption institution said it should be a matter of global concern that while citizens in Africa were confronted with corruption, access to poor basic services, illicit financial flows from Africa were quickly draining the continent and depriving African countries of resources for investment and development.
Currently, illicit financial flows from Africa exceed combined inflows from official development assistance. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa estimates that the annual outflow of illicit finance through trade mispricing alone stands at about US$60 billion, having grown at a real rate of 32.5 per cent in the decade between 2000 and 2009.
It, therefore, called on governments, companies and citizens on the continent to work together to ensure Africa’s development was premised on real transparency, accountability and participation.
In spite of the increasing perception of corruption in Ghana, the country has recorded a marginal improvement on the global corruption index. Ghana is currently ranked 61 out of 175 countries surveyed across the world.
According to the latest report by Transparency International, Ghana has improved marginally in the last three years.
In 2012, Ghana scored 45 points out of 100; 46 points in 2013 and 48 in 2014 [0 means highly corrupt while 100 means very clean].
In the ranking order, the country ranked 64 out of 175 in 2012 and in 2013, the country placed 63 out of 175 countries.
Justice Emile Short and GACC reacts 
But commenting on the report, a former Commissioner of the Commission for Human Right and Administrative Justice, Justice Francis Emile Short, said the latest CPI seemed “contrary to what we are experiencing in the country.”
“There are many voices that have expressed grave concern about the state of corruption in the country. The report does not reflect what we are experiencing,” he said.
The Executive Secretary of the Ghana Anti Corruption Coalition (GACC), Mrs Linda Ofori-Kwafo, said the marginal increase should not give Ghanaians a cause to rejoice.
According to her a plausible explanation for the differences between the Afrobarometer report released last Tuesday and the CPI could be the period within which the CPI data was collected.
Best performing countries 
First launched in 1995, the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) has been widely credited with putting the issue of corruption on the international policy agenda.
According to the index, the least corrupt country in the world is Denmark which scored 92 this year. The Scandinavian country has seen consistent improvement in its ranking since 2012.
The most corrupt countries in the world title went to North Korea and Somalia which have been tied at 8 points since 2012.
Scandinavian countries—Finland, Sweden, Norway— dominated the top 10 least corrupt countries in the world, placing 3rd, 4th and 5th respectively.
Ghana’s performance on the CPI ranking comes on the heels of numerous corruption allegations in the public sector and at a time when the 2014 Afrobarometer survey released last Tuesday showed increasing lost of trust in public institutions, including Parliament, the Police, the Presidency, the Judicial system, ruling and opposition parties.
Africa’s corruption figures still bad 
The report shows the majority of African countries still have a score of less than 50 per cent.  Botswana is ranked 31st as the continent’s best ranked country on the corruption index with 63 points.
Other African countries that performed better than Ghana are Cape Verde (42nd with 57 points); Seychelles (43rd with 55 points); Mauritius (47th with 54 points); Lesotho (55th with 49 points) and Namibia (55th with 49 points).
TI on corruption in Africa  
“In a continent with high level of economic growth rates (compared to many parts of the world), the persistence of widespread corruption is one of the factors inhibiting the transformation of the economic growth into development dividends for all citizens, preventing them from enjoying improved livelihoods and living conditions,” TI said of the performance of Africa on the CPI.
The anti-corruption institution said it should be a matter of global concern that while citizens in Africa were confronted with corruption, access to poor basic services, illicit financial flows from Africa were quickly draining the continent and depriving African countries of resources for investment and development.
Currently, illicit financial flows from Africa exceed combined inflows from official development assistance. The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa estimates that the annual outflow of illicit finance through trade mispricing alone stands at about US$60 billion, having grown at a real rate of 32.5 per cent in the decade between 2000 and 2009.
It, therefore, called on governments, companies and citizens on the continent to work together to ensure Africa’s development was premised on real transparency, accountability and participation.

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