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Showing posts from September, 2016

Ghana imports substandard diesel fuel

A study conducted in Ghana and seven other African countries has revealed that the sulphur content of diesel products imported into the relevant countries are 150 times and, in  some cases 1,000 times, more than the limits allowed in Europe.
Although the quality of the fuels imported into Ghana meets the country’s quality standards, the products pose a great risk to the health of consumers and easily damage the engines of vehicles.
The other countries the study focused on were Senegal, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Benin, Republic of the Congo, Angola and Zambia.
The three-year study conducted by Public Eye, a Swiss environmental non-governmental organisation, detected health-damaging substances, including polyaromatics (diesel) or benzene (gasoline), in concentrations that would never be allowed in fuels in Europe or the United States (US).
Findings
More than two-thirds of the diesel samples (17 out of 25) had a sulphur level higher than 1,500 parts per million (ppm), which i…

Ghana imports substandard diesel fuel

A study conducted in Ghana and seven other African countries has revealed that the sulphur content of diesel products imported into the relevant countries are 150 times and, in  some cases 1,000 times, more than the limits allowed in Europe.
Although the quality of the fuels imported into Ghana meets the country’s quality standards, the products pose a great risk to the health of consumers and easily damage the engines of vehicles.
The other countries the study focused on were Senegal, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Benin, Republic of the Congo, Angola and Zambia.
The three-year study conducted by Public Eye, a Swiss environmental non-governmental organisation, detected health-damaging substances, including polyaromatics (diesel) or benzene (gasoline), in concentrations that would never be allowed in fuels in Europe or the United States (US).
Findings
More than two-thirds of the diesel samples (17 out of 25) had a sulphur level higher than 1,500 parts per million (ppm), which i…

Ghana imports substandard diesel fuel

A study conducted in Ghana and seven other African countries has revealed that the sulphur content of diesel products imported into the relevant countries are 150 times and, in  some cases 1,000 times, more than the limits allowed in Europe.
Although the quality of the fuels imported into Ghana meets the country’s quality standards, the products pose a great risk to the health of consumers and easily damage the engines of vehicles.
The other countries the study focused on were Senegal, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Benin, Republic of the Congo, Angola and Zambia.
The three-year study conducted by Public Eye, a Swiss environmental non-governmental organisation, detected health-damaging substances, including polyaromatics (diesel) or benzene (gasoline), in concentrations that would never be allowed in fuels in Europe or the United States (US).
Findings
More than two-thirds of the diesel samples (17 out of 25) had a sulphur level higher than 1,500 parts per million (ppm), which i…

Ghana imports substandard diesel fuel

A study conducted in Ghana and seven other African countries has revealed that the sulphur content of diesel products imported into the relevant countries are 150 times and, in  some cases 1,000 times, more than the limits allowed in Europe.
Although the quality of the fuels imported into Ghana meets the country’s quality standards, the products pose a great risk to the health of consumers and easily damage the engines of vehicles.
The other countries the study focused on were Senegal, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Benin, Republic of the Congo, Angola and Zambia.
The three-year study conducted by Public Eye, a Swiss environmental non-governmental organisation, detected health-damaging substances, including polyaromatics (diesel) or benzene (gasoline), in concentrations that would never be allowed in fuels in Europe or the United States (US).
Findings
More than two-thirds of the diesel samples (17 out of 25) had a sulphur level higher than 1,500 parts per million (ppm), which i…

DVLA rolls out driver licence project in tertiary institutions

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The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) has launched a tertiary driving licence project to allow students in tertiary institutions obtain driving licences before they graduate from school.
The ‘TERT Drive’ is expected to eliminate students’ use of fake driving licences and driving without licences which are rife among students.
The product was developed in response to the growing need of tertiary students to obtain genuine driving licences before the completion of their respective academic and professional studies.
All processes leading to the acquisition of a driving licence, such as training, testing, personalisation and issuance of licence, will be done on campus.
As part of the initiative, tertiary institutions are allowed to establish their own driving schools, with the approval of the DVLA, or work with DVLA-approved driving schools.
The students will pay the exact statutory amount the public pays to get their licences. They will, however, enjoy som…

Bamboo bicycles launched in Accra

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The Ghana Bamboo Bike Initiative (GMBI) yesterday launched its flagship hand-made bamboo bicycle, with a call on metropolitan, municipal and district assemblies to promote its use in their respective jurisdictions.
The ‘Eco Ride’, which is made up of 75 per cent bamboo, is expected to enhance rural transport and also contribute to reduce the country’s carbon pollution.
The bicycle can be used to transport people to their farms and schools and also facilitate the delivery of  items such as medical supplies to hospitals, particularly those in rural communities.
The bamboo bike is designed for all road conditions in the country.
Enaction of by-laws 
Former President J.A. Kufuor, who unveiled the bicycle and its brand name in Accra, urged authorities at the local government level to enact by-laws to create an environment where those “who prefer to use these bicycles can ride them safely everywhere”.
“Such by-laws will help promote the use of bicycles in our co…

Environmental programme starts next year to reduce deforestation, degradation in cocoa landscape

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Ghana will, from next year, start the implementation of an environmental programme to significantly reduce deforestation and degradation in the country’s cocoa landscape.
The $199-million programme will end in 2021 and is estimated to produce 316 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent emission reduction.
The programme is part of the National REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation + Conservation of Forests, Sustainable Forest Management and Enhancement of Carbon Stocks) initiative.
Ghana Cocoa Forest REDD+ Programme (GCFRP)
Known as the Ghana Cocoa Forest REDD+ Programme (GCFRP), it is expected to be coordinated by the Ghana Cocoa Board (COCOBOD), and the National REDD+ Secretariat under the Forestry Commission in partnership with other stakeholders, including civil society, traditional authorities and the public and private sectors.

The Chief Executive of COCOBOD, Dr Stephen K. Opuni, announced the project at the 22nd meeting of the Partici…

Presidential election: Will the 2016 league winner determine it?

Riddle Riddle! What is the relationship between Kumasi Asante Kotoko and the National Democratic Congress (NDC)? What about the New Patriotic Party (NPP) and Accra Hearts of Oak?
There are two things that are never absent from the Ghanaian’s daily hustle and bustle - football and politics.
Take the two out of everyday life, and Ghana would probably be as drab as chewing a tree bark. The two are, however, defined by superstition and myths.
Football & superstition 
Football and political superstition has a long history.
One of the most infamous cases of superstition in Ghana football was about Accra Hearts of Oak in the 1970s. In 1977, they played exceptionally well throughout the continental championship.
 However, in the final against Hafia Club of Guinea something interesting happened.  The players uncharacteristically missed a number of sitting chances.
 They played all the good football in their own half of the pitch, but whenever anyone found himself in a sco…

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A walk on lake Galilee

Taming deserts, feeding a nation from the wild: Lessons from Israel

“Kamal! The air-condition is not working. I’m baking here one passenger cried.” In no time, there was a chorus of complaints about the steaming heat that has taken over the bus.Concerned about the complaints, Kamal the driver of the tour bus who had earlier released the steering wheel to the tour guide got up to check the state of the cool air turned warm circulating in the bus.
But his touch could not tame the heat, it was beyond him. The temperature was more than 47 degree celcius and the bus was trekking the Judaean  Desert in Israel.
As far as the eye can see, there are a vast stretch of moonscape rock and miles of arid land. But that is not all. In the midst of the heat and sand dunes is a nation’s food basket. Plush green blooms dot a lot of places producing vegetables, crops and horticulture produce including banana, tomatoes, date and  flowers.
For a pilgrim whose homeland still import substantial amount of food in spite of vast swathe of land lyin…