Campaore loses power--following violent protest (Saturday, November 1, 2014) Front page

 The President of Burkina Faso, Mr Blaise Compaore, has resigned after two days of violent street protests in the capital, Ouagadougou.

This brings to an end 27 years of a rule that has seen him win four disputed elections, the last one being in November, 2010.

Where is President Compaore 

The whereabouts of the former military-turned civilian ruler, who came to power through a bloody 1987 coup d’état, is unknown.

But a Reuters report quoted diplomatic and media sources as saying that at the time of going to press, a heavily armed convoy believed to be carrying the former President was seen travelling towards the southern town of Po, near the border with Ghana.

The convoy was reportedly seen moments after Mr Compaore's resignation statement was announced on local media after days of widespread protests.

But speaking to the Daily Graphic, the Deputy Minister of the Interior, Mr James Agalga, said he did not have any information to that effect.     

A terse statement read on the country’s state broadcaster said the former army captain had vacated his post.  

According to a BBC report, Mr Compaore's statement, read on television, said "I declare a vacancy of power with a view to allowing a transition that should end with free and transparent elections in a maximum period of 90 days."

An army spokesman also broke the news to cheering demonstrators in the capital.
Parliament set ablaze
Demonstrators last Thursday stormed parliament, setting fire to the building ostensibly to prevent the country’s parliamentarians from changing the constitution to allow  President Compaore to run for another term.

When the country began to boil last Thursday, Mr Compaore had attempted to calm the situation by dissolving the government and replacing it with a transitional government—an attempt to bring on board opposition voices— but the move backfired.

"On my part, I'll remain available and open to dialogue during the transition period, at the end of which I'll relay power to the next democratically elected President," he said.
But the move rather stirred up more protests and pushed more protestors onto  the streets of Ouagadougou and other cities.

Tyres and vehicles were set ablaze while soldiers confronted protestors with batons and sticks. 
State of emergency 
To stamp  his authority on the situation, the former army captain declared a state of emergency.

This did not sit well with Burkina Faso opposition leader Zephirin Diabre, who  rejected the state of emergency  and insisted that the president’s  resignation was the only solution to the country's crisis.
Compaore loses power; Following violent protests
"The state of emergency is unacceptable. We are calling on the people to show that they are against it," he told Radio Omega, a local broadcaster.

"The resignation of President Blaise Compaore is the only thing that can bring peace to the country."

He called on his supporters to defy the state of emergency and come out in their numbers to protest.

Army arrangement  
In between the confusion, the army chief, General Honore Traore, stepped in to fill the vacuum.

The army chief expects a transitional administration in the meantime until fresh multiparty elections in 90 days. 

Reports say anti-government protesters are celebrating in the capital, following President Compaore's resignation.

However, opinions are divided over whether the army should be in charge. 

Under Burkina Faso's constitution, the head of the National Assembly is the mandatory successor when the president resigns, but parliament had already been dissolved by General Traore last Thursday under short-lived martial law.

Traore was appointed Chief of Staff in 2011 following a revolt within the army over delayed pay and allowances.
The man Compaore

Born in 1950 and trained as a soldier in Cameroun and Morocco, Mr Compaore served under former Head of State, Thomas Sankara as Minister of State to the Presidency.
He took power after Sankara was killed in mysterious circumstances by a group of soldiers in 1987. He disarmed local militias and had a firm grip on the presidency. 

With economic downturn staring him in the face, Campaore discarded his socialist leanings and embarked on a privatisation programme and austerity measures sponsored by the International Monetary Fund.

In subsequent years, the country achieved some level of  political stability. 

Described by his critics as more of a strongman than a statesman, Mr Compaore is loved for bringing some economic stability to the small West African nation, but equally hated for spending his early years ruling with an iron fist and stirring rebellions among his neighbours.

The President of Burkina Faso, Mr Blaise Compaore, has resigned after two days of violent street protests in the capital, Ouagadougou.
This brings to an end 27 years of a rule that has seen him win four disputed elections, the last one being in November, 2010.

Where is President Compaore 

The whereabouts of the former military-turned civilian ruler, who came to power through a bloody 1987 coup d’état, is unknown.
But a Reuters report quoted diplomatic and media sources as saying that at the time of going to press, a heavily armed convoy believed to be carrying the former President was seen travelling towards the southern town of Po, near the border with Ghana.
The convoy was reportedly seen moments after Mr Compaore's resignation statement was announced on local media after days of widespread protests.
But speaking to the Daily Graphic, the Deputy Minister of the Interior, Mr James Agalga, said he did not have any information to that effect.  
A terse statement read on the country’s state broadcaster said the former army captain had vacated his post.
According to a BBC report, Mr Compaore's statement, read on television, said "I declare a vacancy of power with a view to allowing a transition that should end with free and transparent elections in a maximum period of 90 days."
An army spokesman also broke the news to cheering demonstrators in the capital.

Parliament set ablaze

Demonstrators last Thursday stormed parliament, setting fire to the building ostensibly to prevent the country’s parliamentarians from changing the constitution to allow  President Compaore to run for another term.
When the country began to boil last Thursday, Mr Compaore had attempted to calm the situation by dissolving the government and replacing it with a transitional government—an attempt to bring on board opposition voices— but the move backfired.
"On my part, I'll remain available and open to dialogue during the transition period, at the end of which I'll relay power to the next democratically elected President," he said.
But the move rather stirred up more protests and pushed more protestors onto  the streets of Ouagadougou and other cities.
Tyres and vehicles were set ablaze while soldiers confronted protestors with batons and sticks.

State of emergency 

To stamp  his authority on the situation, the former army captain declared a state of emergency.
This did not sit well with Burkina Faso opposition leader Zephirin Diabre, who  rejected the state of emergency  and insisted that the president’s  resignation was the only solution to the country's crisis.
"The state of emergency is unacceptable. We are calling on the people to show that they are against it," he told Radio Omega, a local broadcaster.
"The resignation of President Blaise Compaore is the only thing that can bring peace to the country."
He called on his supporters to defy the state of emergency and come out in their numbers to protest.

Army arrangement  

In between the confusion, the army chief, General Honore Traore, stepped in to fill the vacuum.
The army chief expects a transitional administration in the meantime until fresh multiparty elections in 90 days.
Reports say anti-government protesters are celebrating in the capital, following President Compaore's resignation.
However, opinions are divided over whether the army should be in charge.
Under Burkina Faso's constitution, the head of the National Assembly is the mandatory successor when the president resigns, but parliament had already been dissolved by General Traore last Thursday under short-lived martial law.
Traore was appointed Chief of Staff in 2011 following a revolt within the army over delayed pay and allowances.

The man Compaore

Born in 1950 and trained as a soldier in Cameroun and Morocco, Mr Compaore served under former Head of State, Thomas Sankara as Minister of State to the Presidency.
He took power after Sankara was killed in mysterious circumstances by a group of soldiers in 1987. He disarmed local militias and had a firm grip on the presidency.
With economic downturn staring him in the face, Campaore discarded his socialist leanings and embarked on a privatisation programme and austerity measures sponsored by the International Monetary Fund.
In subsequent years, the country achieved some level of  political stability.
Described by his critics as more of a strongman than a statesman, Mr Compaore is loved for bringing some economic stability to the small West African nation, but equally hated for spending his early years ruling with an iron fist and stirring rebellions among his neighbours.
- See more at: http://graphic.com.gh/news/general-news/33134-compaore-loses-power-following-violent-protests.html#sthash.SgAukZW5.dpuf
The President of Burkina Faso, Mr Blaise Compaore, has resigned after two days of violent street protests in the capital, Ouagadougou.
This brings to an end 27 years of a rule that has seen him win four disputed elections, the last one being in November, 2010.

Where is President Compaore 

The whereabouts of the former military-turned civilian ruler, who came to power through a bloody 1987 coup d’état, is unknown.
But a Reuters report quoted diplomatic and media sources as saying that at the time of going to press, a heavily armed convoy believed to be carrying the former President was seen travelling towards the southern town of Po, near the border with Ghana.
The convoy was reportedly seen moments after Mr Compaore's resignation statement was announced on local media after days of widespread protests.
But speaking to the Daily Graphic, the Deputy Minister of the Interior, Mr James Agalga, said he did not have any information to that effect.  
A terse statement read on the country’s state broadcaster said the former army captain had vacated his post.
According to a BBC report, Mr Compaore's statement, read on television, said "I declare a vacancy of power with a view to allowing a transition that should end with free and transparent elections in a maximum period of 90 days."
An army spokesman also broke the news to cheering demonstrators in the capital.

Parliament set ablaze

Demonstrators last Thursday stormed parliament, setting fire to the building ostensibly to prevent the country’s parliamentarians from changing the constitution to allow  President Compaore to run for another term.
When the country began to boil last Thursday, Mr Compaore had attempted to calm the situation by dissolving the government and replacing it with a transitional government—an attempt to bring on board opposition voices— but the move backfired.
"On my part, I'll remain available and open to dialogue during the transition period, at the end of which I'll relay power to the next democratically elected President," he said.
But the move rather stirred up more protests and pushed more protestors onto  the streets of Ouagadougou and other cities.
Tyres and vehicles were set ablaze while soldiers confronted protestors with batons and sticks.

State of emergency 

To stamp  his authority on the situation, the former army captain declared a state of emergency.
This did not sit well with Burkina Faso opposition leader Zephirin Diabre, who  rejected the state of emergency  and insisted that the president’s  resignation was the only solution to the country's crisis.
"The state of emergency is unacceptable. We are calling on the people to show that they are against it," he told Radio Omega, a local broadcaster.
"The resignation of President Blaise Compaore is the only thing that can bring peace to the country."
He called on his supporters to defy the state of emergency and come out in their numbers to protest.

Army arrangement  

In between the confusion, the army chief, General Honore Traore, stepped in to fill the vacuum.
The army chief expects a transitional administration in the meantime until fresh multiparty elections in 90 days.
Reports say anti-government protesters are celebrating in the capital, following President Compaore's resignation.
However, opinions are divided over whether the army should be in charge.
Under Burkina Faso's constitution, the head of the National Assembly is the mandatory successor when the president resigns, but parliament had already been dissolved by General Traore last Thursday under short-lived martial law.
Traore was appointed Chief of Staff in 2011 following a revolt within the army over delayed pay and allowances.

The man Compaore

Born in 1950 and trained as a soldier in Cameroun and Morocco, Mr Compaore served under former Head of State, Thomas Sankara as Minister of State to the Presidency.
He took power after Sankara was killed in mysterious circumstances by a group of soldiers in 1987. He disarmed local militias and had a firm grip on the presidency.
With economic downturn staring him in the face, Campaore discarded his socialist leanings and embarked on a privatisation programme and austerity measures sponsored by the International Monetary Fund.
In subsequent years, the country achieved some level of  political stability.
Described by his critics as more of a strongman than a statesman, Mr Compaore is loved for bringing some economic stability to the small West African nation, but equally hated for spending his early years ruling with an iron fist and stirring rebellions among his neighbours.
- See more at: http://graphic.com.gh/news/general-news/33134-compaore-loses-power-following-violent-protests.html#sthash.SgAukZW5.dpuf  The President of Burkina Faso, Mr Blaise Compaore, has resigned after two days of violent street protests in the capital, Ouagadougou.
This brings to an end 27 years of a rule that has seen him win four disputed elections, the last one being in November, 2010.
Where is President Compaore 
The whereabouts of the former military-turned civilian ruler, who came to power through a bloody 1987 coup d’état, is unknown.
But a Reuters report quoted diplomatic and media sources as saying that at the time of going to press, a heavily armed convoy believed to be carrying the former President was seen travelling towards the southern town of Po, near the border with Ghana.
The convoy was reportedly seen moments after Mr Compaore's resignation statement was announced on local media after days of widespread protests.
But speaking to the Daily Graphic, the Deputy Minister of the Interior, Mr James Agalga, said he did not have any information to that effect.     
A terse statement read on the country’s state broadcaster said the former army captain had vacated his post.  
According to a BBC report, Mr Compaore's statement, read on television, said "I declare a vacancy of power with a view to allowing a transition that should end with free and transparent elections in a maximum period of 90 days."
An army spokesman also broke the news to cheering demonstrators in the capital.
Parliament set ablaze
Demonstrators last Thursday stormed parliament, setting fire to the building ostensibly to prevent the country’s parliamentarians from changing the constitution to allow  President Compaore to run for another term.
When the country began to boil last Thursday, Mr Compaore had attempted to calm the situation by dissolving the government and replacing it with a transitional government—an attempt to bring on board opposition voices— but the move backfired.
"On my part, I'll remain available and open to dialogue during the transition period, at the end of which I'll relay power to the next democratically elected President," he said.
But the move rather stirred up more protests and pushed more protestors onto  the streets of Ouagadougou and other cities.
Tyres and vehicles were set ablaze while soldiers confronted protestors with batons and sticks. 
State of emergency 
To stamp  his authority on the situation, the former army captain declared a state of emergency.
This did not sit well with Burkina Faso opposition leader Zephirin Diabre, who  rejected the state of emergency  and insisted that the president’s  resignation was the only solution to the country's crisis.
"The state of emergency is unacceptable. We are calling on the people to show that they are against it," he told Radio Omega, a local broadcaster.
"The resignation of President Blaise Compaore is the only thing that can bring peace to the country."
He called on his supporters to defy the state of emergency and come out in their numbers to protest.
Army arrangement  
In between the confusion, the army chief, General Honore Traore, stepped in to fill the vacuum.
The army chief expects a transitional administration in the meantime until fresh multiparty elections in 90 days. 
Reports say anti-government protesters are celebrating in the capital, following President Compaore's resignation.
However, opinions are divided over whether the army should be in charge. 
Under Burkina Faso's constitution, the head of the National Assembly is the mandatory successor when the president resigns, but parliament had already been dissolved by General Traore last Thursday under short-lived martial law.
Traore was appointed Chief of Staff in 2011 following a revolt within the army over delayed pay and allowances.
The man Compaore
Born in 1950 and trained as a soldier in Cameroun and Morocco, Mr Compaore served under former Head of State, Thomas Sankara as Minister of State to the Presidency.
He took power after Sankara was killed in mysterious circumstances by a group of soldiers in 1987. He disarmed local militias and had a firm grip on the presidency. 
With economic downturn staring him in the face, Campaore discarded his socialist leanings and embarked on a privatisation programme and austerity measures sponsored by the International Monetary Fund.
In subsequent years, the country achieved some level of  political stability. 
Described by his critics as more of a strongman than a statesman, Mr Compaore is loved for bringing some economic stability to the small West African nation, but equally hated for spending his early years ruling with an iron fist and stirring rebellions among his neighbours.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Spiritual healers, men of God take over billboards, Monday, September 17, 2012, pg 32

Need an Auto Loan? Monday, April 2, 2012, pg 20

Mad rush for our gold --who benefits? June 18, 2013 (Front page)